[DRBD-user] sock_sendmsg time expired

Steven Wilton steven.wilton at team.eftel.com
Wed Nov 17 01:42:01 CET 2004


I ran "/etc/init.d/drbd start" on both storage0 and storage1 (they are 
debian systems).  I then ran the following commands on storage1
"drbdsetup /dev/drbd0 primary --do-what-i-say"
"drbdsetup /dev/drbd1 primary --do-what-i-say"
"drbdsetup /dev/drbd2 primary --do-what-i-say"
"drbdsetup /dev/drbd3 primary --do-what-i-say"
"drbdsetup /dev/drbd4 primary --do-what-i-say"
"drbdsetup /dev/drbd5 primary --do-what-i-say"

I then got the reported errors on storage0.  The drbd conf is as follows:

#
# drbd.conf example
#
# parameters you _need_ to change are the hostname, device, disk,
# meta-disk, address and port in the "on <hostname> {}" sections.
#
# you ought to know about the protocol, and the various timeouts.
#
# you probably want to set the rate in the syncer sections
#
# increase timeout and maybe ping-int in net{}, if you see
# problems with "connection lost/connection established"
# (or change your setup to reduce network latency; make sure full
#  duplex behaves as such; check average roundtrip times while
#  network is saturated; and so on ...)
#

#
# At most ONE global section is allowed.
# It must precede any resource section.
#
global {
     # use this if you want to define more resources later
     # without reloading the module.
     # by default we load the module with exactly as many devices
     # as configured mentioned in this file.
     #
     # minor-count 5;

     # The user dialog counts and displays the seconds it waited so
     # far. You might want to disable this if you have the console
     # of your server connected to a serial terminal server with
     # limited logging capacity.
     # The Dialog will print the count each 'dialog-refresh' seconds,
     # set it to 0 to disable redrawing completely. [ default = 1 ]
     #
     # dialog-refresh 5; # 5 seconds

     # this is for people who set up a drbd device via the
     # loopback network interface or between two VMs on the same
     # box, for testing/simulating/presentation
     # otherwise it could trigger a run_tasq_queue deadlock.
     # I'm not sure whether this deadlock can happen with two
     # nodes, but it seems at least extremely unlikely; and since
     # the io_hints boost performance, keep them enabled.
     #
     # With linux 2.6 it no longer makes sense.
     # So this option should vanish.     --lge
     #
     # disable-io-hints;
}

resource home-log {
   protocol C;

   # what should be done in case the cluster starts up in
   # degraded mode, but knows it has inconsistent data.
   incon-degr-cmd "echo '!DRBD! pri on incon-degr' | wall ; sleep 60 ; 
halt -f";

   startup {
     # Wait for connection timeout.
     # The init script blocks the boot process until the resources
     # are connected.
     # In case you want to limit the wait time, do it here.
     #
     # wfc-timeout  0;

     # Wait for connection timeout if this node was a degraded cluster.
     # In case a degraded cluster (= cluster with only one node left)
     # is rebooted, this timeout value is used.
     #
     degr-wfc-timeout 120;    # 2 minutes.
   }

   disk {
     # if the lower level device reports io-error you have the choice of
     #  "pass_on"  ->  Report the io-error to the upper layers.
     #                 Primary   -> report it to the mounted file system.
     #                 Secondary -> ignore it.
     #  "panic"    ->  The node leaves the cluster by doing a kernel panic.
     #  "detach"   ->  The node drops its backing storage device, and
     #                 continues in disk less mode.
     #
     on-io-error   detach;
   }

   net {
     # this is the size of the tcp socket send buffer
     # increase it _carefully_ if you want to use protocol A over a
     # high latency network with reasonable write throughput.
     # defaults to 2*65535; you might try even 1M, but if your kernel or
     # network driver chokes on that, you have been warned.
     # sndbuf-size 512k;

     # timeout       60;    #  6 seconds  (unit = 0.1 seconds)
     # connect-int   10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)
     # ping-int      10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)

     # Maximal number of requests (4K) to be allocated by DRBD.
     # The minimum is hardcoded to 32 (=128 kb).
     # For hight performance installations it might help if you
     # increase that number. These buffers are used to hold
     # datablocks while they are written to disk.
     #
     max-buffers     2048;

     # The highest number of data blocks between two write barriers.
     # If you set this < 10 you might decrease your performance.
     # max-epoch-size  2048;

     # if some block send times out this many times, the peer is
     # considered dead, even if it still answers ping requests.
     # ko-count 4;

     # if the connection to the peer is lost you have the choice of
     #  "reconnect"   -> Try to reconnect (AKA WFConnection state)
     #  "stand_alone" -> Do not reconnect (AKA StandAlone state)
     #  "freeze_io"   -> Try to reconnect but freeze all IO until
     #                   the connection is established again.
     # on-disconnect reconnect;

   }

   syncer {
     # Limit the bandwith used by the resynchronisation process.
     # default unit is KB/sec; optional suffixes K,M,G are allowed
     #
     rate 10M;

     # All devices in one group are resynchronized parallel.
     # Resychronisation of groups is serialized in ascending order.
     # Put DRBD resources which are on different physical disks in one 
group.
     # Put DRBD resources on one physical disk in different groups.
     #
     group 1;

     # Configures the size of the active set. Each extent is 4M,
     # 257 Extents ~> 1GB active set size. In case your syncer
     # runs @ 10MB/sec, all resync after a primary's crash will last
     # 1GB / ( 10MB/sec ) ~ 102 seconds ~ One Minute and 42 Seconds.
     # BTW, the hash algorithm works best if the number of al-extents
     # is prime. (To test the worst case performace use a power of 2)
     al-extents 257;
   }

   on storage1 {
     device     /dev/drbd0;
     disk       /dev/sda5;
     address    10.16.101.27:7701;
     meta-disk  /dev/sda7[0];
   }

   on storage0 {
     device    /dev/drbd0;
     disk      /dev/sda5;
     address   10.16.101.16:7701;
     meta-disk /dev/sda7[0];
   }
}

resource mail-log {
   protocol C;

   # what should be done in case the cluster starts up in
   # degraded mode, but knows it has inconsistent data.
   incon-degr-cmd "echo '!DRBD! pri on incon-degr' | wall ; sleep 60 ; 
halt -f";

   startup {
     # Wait for connection timeout.
     # The init script blocks the boot process until the resources
     # are connected.
     # In case you want to limit the wait time, do it here.
     #
     # wfc-timeout  0;

     # Wait for connection timeout if this node was a degraded cluster.
     # In case a degraded cluster (= cluster with only one node left)
     # is rebooted, this timeout value is used.
     #
     degr-wfc-timeout 120;    # 2 minutes.
   }

   disk {
     # if the lower level device reports io-error you have the choice of
     #  "pass_on"  ->  Report the io-error to the upper layers.
     #                 Primary   -> report it to the mounted file system.
     #                 Secondary -> ignore it.
     #  "panic"    ->  The node leaves the cluster by doing a kernel panic.
     #  "detach"   ->  The node drops its backing storage device, and
     #                 continues in disk less mode.
     #
     on-io-error   detach;
   }

   net {
     # this is the size of the tcp socket send buffer
     # increase it _carefully_ if you want to use protocol A over a
     # high latency network with reasonable write throughput.
     # defaults to 2*65535; you might try even 1M, but if your kernel or
     # network driver chokes on that, you have been warned.
     # sndbuf-size 512k;

     # timeout       60;    #  6 seconds  (unit = 0.1 seconds)
     # connect-int   10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)
     # ping-int      10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)

     # Maximal number of requests (4K) to be allocated by DRBD.
     # The minimum is hardcoded to 32 (=128 kb).
     # For hight performance installations it might help if you
     # increase that number. These buffers are used to hold
     # datablocks while they are written to disk.
     #
     max-buffers     2048;

     # The highest number of data blocks between two write barriers.
     # If you set this < 10 you might decrease your performance.
     # max-epoch-size  2048;

     # if some block send times out this many times, the peer is
     # considered dead, even if it still answers ping requests.
     # ko-count 4;

     # if the connection to the peer is lost you have the choice of
     #  "reconnect"   -> Try to reconnect (AKA WFConnection state)
     #  "stand_alone" -> Do not reconnect (AKA StandAlone state)
     #  "freeze_io"   -> Try to reconnect but freeze all IO until
     #                   the connection is established again.
     # on-disconnect reconnect;

   }

   syncer {
     # Limit the bandwith used by the resynchronisation process.
     # default unit is KB/sec; optional suffixes K,M,G are allowed
     #
     rate 10M;

     # All devices in one group are resynchronized parallel.
     # Resychronisation of groups is serialized in ascending order.
     # Put DRBD resources which are on different physical disks in one 
group.
     # Put DRBD resources on one physical disk in different groups.
     #
     group 1;

     # Configures the size of the active set. Each extent is 4M,
     # 257 Extents ~> 1GB active set size. In case your syncer
     # runs @ 10MB/sec, all resync after a primary's crash will last
     # 1GB / ( 10MB/sec ) ~ 102 seconds ~ One Minute and 42 Seconds.
     # BTW, the hash algorithm works best if the number of al-extents
     # is prime. (To test the worst case performace use a power of 2)
     al-extents 257;
   }

   on storage1 {
     device     /dev/drbd1;
     disk       /dev/sda6;
     address    10.16.101.27:7702;
     meta-disk  /dev/sda7[1];
   }

   on storage0 {
     device    /dev/drbd1;
     disk      /dev/sda6;
     address   10.16.101.16:7702;
     meta-disk /dev/sda7[1];
   }
}

resource etc {
   protocol C;

   # what should be done in case the cluster starts up in
   # degraded mode, but knows it has inconsistent data.
   incon-degr-cmd "echo '!DRBD! pri on incon-degr' | wall ; sleep 60 ; 
halt -f";

   startup {
     # Wait for connection timeout.
     # The init script blocks the boot process until the resources
     # are connected.
     # In case you want to limit the wait time, do it here.
     #
     # wfc-timeout  0;

     # Wait for connection timeout if this node was a degraded cluster.
     # In case a degraded cluster (= cluster with only one node left)
     # is rebooted, this timeout value is used.
     #
     degr-wfc-timeout 120;    # 2 minutes.
   }

   disk {
     # if the lower level device reports io-error you have the choice of
     #  "pass_on"  ->  Report the io-error to the upper layers.
     #                 Primary   -> report it to the mounted file system.
     #                 Secondary -> ignore it.
     #  "panic"    ->  The node leaves the cluster by doing a kernel panic.
     #  "detach"   ->  The node drops its backing storage device, and
     #                 continues in disk less mode.
     #
     on-io-error   detach;
   }

   net {
     # this is the size of the tcp socket send buffer
     # increase it _carefully_ if you want to use protocol A over a
     # high latency network with reasonable write throughput.
     # defaults to 2*65535; you might try even 1M, but if your kernel or
     # network driver chokes on that, you have been warned.
     # sndbuf-size 512k;

     # timeout       60;    #  6 seconds  (unit = 0.1 seconds)
     # connect-int   10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)
     # ping-int      10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)

     # Maximal number of requests (4K) to be allocated by DRBD.
     # The minimum is hardcoded to 32 (=128 kb).
     # For hight performance installations it might help if you
     # increase that number. These buffers are used to hold
     # datablocks while they are written to disk.
     #
     max-buffers     2048;

     # The highest number of data blocks between two write barriers.
     # If you set this < 10 you might decrease your performance.
     # max-epoch-size  2048;

     # if some block send times out this many times, the peer is
     # considered dead, even if it still answers ping requests.
     # ko-count 4;

     # if the connection to the peer is lost you have the choice of
     #  "reconnect"   -> Try to reconnect (AKA WFConnection state)
     #  "stand_alone" -> Do not reconnect (AKA StandAlone state)
     #  "freeze_io"   -> Try to reconnect but freeze all IO until
     #                   the connection is established again.
     # on-disconnect reconnect;

   }

   syncer {
     # Limit the bandwith used by the resynchronisation process.
     # default unit is KB/sec; optional suffixes K,M,G are allowed
     #
     rate 10M;

     # All devices in one group are resynchronized parallel.
     # Resychronisation of groups is serialized in ascending order.
     # Put DRBD resources which are on different physical disks in one 
group.
     # Put DRBD resources on one physical disk in different groups.
     #
     group 1;

     # Configures the size of the active set. Each extent is 4M,
     # 257 Extents ~> 1GB active set size. In case your syncer
     # runs @ 10MB/sec, all resync after a primary's crash will last
     # 1GB / ( 10MB/sec ) ~ 102 seconds ~ One Minute and 42 Seconds.
     # BTW, the hash algorithm works best if the number of al-extents
     # is prime. (To test the worst case performace use a power of 2)
     al-extents 257;
   }

   on storage1 {
     device     /dev/drbd2;
     disk       /dev/sdb1;
     address    10.16.101.27:7703;
     meta-disk  /dev/sda7[2];
   }

   on storage0 {
     device    /dev/drbd2;
     disk      /dev/sdb1;
     address   10.16.101.16:7703;
     meta-disk /dev/sda7[2];
   }
}

resource scripts {
   protocol C;

   # what should be done in case the cluster starts up in
   # degraded mode, but knows it has inconsistent data.
   incon-degr-cmd "echo '!DRBD! pri on incon-degr' | wall ; sleep 60 ; 
halt -f";

   startup {
     # Wait for connection timeout.
     # The init script blocks the boot process until the resources
     # are connected.
     # In case you want to limit the wait time, do it here.
     #
     # wfc-timeout  0;

     # Wait for connection timeout if this node was a degraded cluster.
     # In case a degraded cluster (= cluster with only one node left)
     # is rebooted, this timeout value is used.
     #
     degr-wfc-timeout 120;    # 2 minutes.
   }

   disk {
     # if the lower level device reports io-error you have the choice of
     #  "pass_on"  ->  Report the io-error to the upper layers.
     #                 Primary   -> report it to the mounted file system.
     #                 Secondary -> ignore it.
     #  "panic"    ->  The node leaves the cluster by doing a kernel panic.
     #  "detach"   ->  The node drops its backing storage device, and
     #                 continues in disk less mode.
     #
     on-io-error   detach;
   }

   net {
     # this is the size of the tcp socket send buffer
     # increase it _carefully_ if you want to use protocol A over a
     # high latency network with reasonable write throughput.
     # defaults to 2*65535; you might try even 1M, but if your kernel or
     # network driver chokes on that, you have been warned.
     # sndbuf-size 512k;

     # timeout       60;    #  6 seconds  (unit = 0.1 seconds)
     # connect-int   10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)
     # ping-int      10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)

     # Maximal number of requests (4K) to be allocated by DRBD.
     # The minimum is hardcoded to 32 (=128 kb).
     # For hight performance installations it might help if you
     # increase that number. These buffers are used to hold
     # datablocks while they are written to disk.
     #
     max-buffers     2048;

     # The highest number of data blocks between two write barriers.
     # If you set this < 10 you might decrease your performance.
     # max-epoch-size  2048;

     # if some block send times out this many times, the peer is
     # considered dead, even if it still answers ping requests.
     # ko-count 4;

     # if the connection to the peer is lost you have the choice of
     #  "reconnect"   -> Try to reconnect (AKA WFConnection state)
     #  "stand_alone" -> Do not reconnect (AKA StandAlone state)
     #  "freeze_io"   -> Try to reconnect but freeze all IO until
     #                   the connection is established again.
     # on-disconnect reconnect;

   }

   syncer {
     # Limit the bandwith used by the resynchronisation process.
     # default unit is KB/sec; optional suffixes K,M,G are allowed
     #
     rate 10M;

     # All devices in one group are resynchronized parallel.
     # Resychronisation of groups is serialized in ascending order.
     # Put DRBD resources which are on different physical disks in one 
group.
     # Put DRBD resources on one physical disk in different groups.
     #
     group 1;

     # Configures the size of the active set. Each extent is 4M,
     # 257 Extents ~> 1GB active set size. In case your syncer
     # runs @ 10MB/sec, all resync after a primary's crash will last
     # 1GB / ( 10MB/sec ) ~ 102 seconds ~ One Minute and 42 Seconds.
     # BTW, the hash algorithm works best if the number of al-extents
     # is prime. (To test the worst case performace use a power of 2)
     al-extents 257;
   }

   on storage1 {
     device     /dev/drbd3;
     disk       /dev/sdb2;
     address    10.16.101.27:7704;
     meta-disk  /dev/sda7[3];
   }

   on storage0 {
     device    /dev/drbd3;
     disk      /dev/sdb2;
     address   10.16.101.16:7704;
     meta-disk /dev/sda7[3];
   }
}

resource home {
   protocol C;

   # what should be done in case the cluster starts up in
   # degraded mode, but knows it has inconsistent data.
   incon-degr-cmd "echo '!DRBD! pri on incon-degr' | wall ; sleep 60 ; 
halt -f";

   startup {
     # Wait for connection timeout.
     # The init script blocks the boot process until the resources
     # are connected.
     # In case you want to limit the wait time, do it here.
     #
     # wfc-timeout  0;

     # Wait for connection timeout if this node was a degraded cluster.
     # In case a degraded cluster (= cluster with only one node left)
     # is rebooted, this timeout value is used.
     #
     degr-wfc-timeout 120;    # 2 minutes.
   }

   disk {
     # if the lower level device reports io-error you have the choice of
     #  "pass_on"  ->  Report the io-error to the upper layers.
     #                 Primary   -> report it to the mounted file system.
     #                 Secondary -> ignore it.
     #  "panic"    ->  The node leaves the cluster by doing a kernel panic.
     #  "detach"   ->  The node drops its backing storage device, and
     #                 continues in disk less mode.
     #
     on-io-error   detach;
   }

   net {
     # this is the size of the tcp socket send buffer
     # increase it _carefully_ if you want to use protocol A over a
     # high latency network with reasonable write throughput.
     # defaults to 2*65535; you might try even 1M, but if your kernel or
     # network driver chokes on that, you have been warned.
     # sndbuf-size 512k;

     # timeout       60;    #  6 seconds  (unit = 0.1 seconds)
     # connect-int   10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)
     # ping-int      10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)

     # Maximal number of requests (4K) to be allocated by DRBD.
     # The minimum is hardcoded to 32 (=128 kb).
     # For hight performance installations it might help if you
     # increase that number. These buffers are used to hold
     # datablocks while they are written to disk.
     #
     max-buffers     2048;

     # The highest number of data blocks between two write barriers.
     # If you set this < 10 you might decrease your performance.
     # max-epoch-size  2048;

     # if some block send times out this many times, the peer is
     # considered dead, even if it still answers ping requests.
     # ko-count 4;

     # if the connection to the peer is lost you have the choice of
     #  "reconnect"   -> Try to reconnect (AKA WFConnection state)
     #  "stand_alone" -> Do not reconnect (AKA StandAlone state)
     #  "freeze_io"   -> Try to reconnect but freeze all IO until
     #                   the connection is established again.
     # on-disconnect reconnect;

   }

   syncer {
     # Limit the bandwith used by the resynchronisation process.
     # default unit is KB/sec; optional suffixes K,M,G are allowed
     #
     rate 10M;

     # All devices in one group are resynchronized parallel.
     # Resychronisation of groups is serialized in ascending order.
     # Put DRBD resources which are on different physical disks in one 
group.
     # Put DRBD resources on one physical disk in different groups.
     #
     group 1;

     # Configures the size of the active set. Each extent is 4M,
     # 257 Extents ~> 1GB active set size. In case your syncer
     # runs @ 10MB/sec, all resync after a primary's crash will last
     # 1GB / ( 10MB/sec ) ~ 102 seconds ~ One Minute and 42 Seconds.
     # BTW, the hash algorithm works best if the number of al-extents
     # is prime. (To test the worst case performace use a power of 2)
     al-extents 257;
   }

   on storage1 {
     device     /dev/drbd4;
     disk       /dev/sdb3;
     address    10.16.101.27:7705;
     meta-disk  /dev/sda7[4];
   }

   on storage0 {
     device    /dev/drbd4;
     disk      /dev/sdb3;
     address   10.16.101.16:7705;
     meta-disk /dev/sda7[4];
   }
}

resource mail {
   protocol C;

   # what should be done in case the cluster starts up in
   # degraded mode, but knows it has inconsistent data.
   incon-degr-cmd "echo '!DRBD! pri on incon-degr' | wall ; sleep 60 ; 
halt -f";

   startup {
     # Wait for connection timeout.
     # The init script blocks the boot process until the resources
     # are connected.
     # In case you want to limit the wait time, do it here.
     #
     # wfc-timeout  0;

     # Wait for connection timeout if this node was a degraded cluster.
     # In case a degraded cluster (= cluster with only one node left)
     # is rebooted, this timeout value is used.
     #
     degr-wfc-timeout 120;    # 2 minutes.
   }

   disk {
     # if the lower level device reports io-error you have the choice of
     #  "pass_on"  ->  Report the io-error to the upper layers.
     #                 Primary   -> report it to the mounted file system.
     #                 Secondary -> ignore it.
     #  "panic"    ->  The node leaves the cluster by doing a kernel panic.
     #  "detach"   ->  The node drops its backing storage device, and
     #                 continues in disk less mode.
     #
     on-io-error   detach;
   }

   net {
     # this is the size of the tcp socket send buffer
     # increase it _carefully_ if you want to use protocol A over a
     # high latency network with reasonable write throughput.
     # defaults to 2*65535; you might try even 1M, but if your kernel or
     # network driver chokes on that, you have been warned.
     # sndbuf-size 512k;

     # timeout       60;    #  6 seconds  (unit = 0.1 seconds)
     # connect-int   10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)
     # ping-int      10;    # 10 seconds  (unit = 1 second)

     # Maximal number of requests (4K) to be allocated by DRBD.
     # The minimum is hardcoded to 32 (=128 kb).
     # For hight performance installations it might help if you
     # increase that number. These buffers are used to hold
     # datablocks while they are written to disk.
     #
     max-buffers     2048;

     # The highest number of data blocks between two write barriers.
     # If you set this < 10 you might decrease your performance.
     # max-epoch-size  2048;

     # if some block send times out this many times, the peer is
     # considered dead, even if it still answers ping requests.
     # ko-count 4;

     # if the connection to the peer is lost you have the choice of
     #  "reconnect"   -> Try to reconnect (AKA WFConnection state)
     #  "stand_alone" -> Do not reconnect (AKA StandAlone state)
     #  "freeze_io"   -> Try to reconnect but freeze all IO until
     #                   the connection is established again.
     # on-disconnect reconnect;

   }

   syncer {
     # Limit the bandwith used by the resynchronisation process.
     # default unit is KB/sec; optional suffixes K,M,G are allowed
     #
     rate 10M;

     # All devices in one group are resynchronized parallel.
     # Resychronisation of groups is serialized in ascending order.
     # Put DRBD resources which are on different physical disks in one 
group.
     # Put DRBD resources on one physical disk in different groups.
     #
     group 1;

     # Configures the size of the active set. Each extent is 4M,
     # 257 Extents ~> 1GB active set size. In case your syncer
     # runs @ 10MB/sec, all resync after a primary's crash will last
     # 1GB / ( 10MB/sec ) ~ 102 seconds ~ One Minute and 42 Seconds.
     # BTW, the hash algorithm works best if the number of al-extents
     # is prime. (To test the worst case performace use a power of 2)
     al-extents 257;
   }

   on storage1 {
     device     /dev/drbd5;
     disk       /dev/sdc1;
     address    10.16.101.27:7706;
     meta-disk  /dev/sda7[5];
   }

   on storage0 {
     device    /dev/drbd5;
     disk      /dev/sdc1;
     address   10.16.101.16:7706;
     meta-disk /dev/sda7[5];
   }
}


Philipp Reisner wrote:
> 
> 
> On Tuesday 16 November 2004 09:20, you wrote:
>  > Ahh, drbd version 0.7.5 and kernel 2.6.9
>  >
>  > Steven
>  >
>  > Philipp Reisner wrote:
>  > > [...]
>  > >
>  > >>  I noticed that there were a few threads related to the sock_sendmsg
>  > >>time expired, error, but did not see the second error in the archive.
>  > >>
>  > >>Is there enough information above to debug the problem?
>  > >
>  > > Hmmm, first of all I would like to know which version of DRBD you 
> used?
>  > > And which kernel version ?
>  > >
>  > > -philipp
> 
> Hi,
> 
> Hmm. What did you exactly do.
> 
> Please post all steps you did.
> "drbdsetup /dev/drbd5 primary --do-waht-I-say " was the last command you
> issued before it OOPSed, waht did you do before ?
> 
> Please post all commands you issues on both nodes.
> 
> -phil
> -- 
> : Dipl-Ing Philipp Reisner                      Tel +43-1-8178292-50 :
> : LINBIT Information Technologies GmbH          Fax +43-1-8178292-82 :
> : Schönbrunnerstr 244, 1120 Vienna, Austria    http://www.linbit.com :
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